UK economy suffers record 9.9% slump in 2020

Britain’s coronavirus-ravaged economy shrank 9.9% in 2020, the biggest annual fall in output since modern records began, but it avoided heading back towards recession at the end of last year, official figures showed on Friday, according to Reuters. 

Britain’s gross domestic product (GDP) grew 1.0% between October and December, the Office for National Statistics said, at the top end of the range of forecasts by economists in a Reuters poll.

This makes it unlikely that Britain will see two straight quarters of contraction - the standard definition of recession in Europe - even though the economy is set to shrink sharply in early 2021 due to the effects of a third COVID lockdown.

Britain’s economy grew 1.2% in December alone, after a 2.3% fall in output in November when there was a partial lockdown, leaving output 6.3% lower than in February before the start of the pandemic.

However the Bank of England forecasts the economy will shrink by 4% in the first three months of 2021 due to a new lockdown and Brexit disruption, and take until early 2022 before it regains its pre-COVID size, assuming vaccination continues to smoothly.

Many economists think the rebound will be slower.

Britain has reported Europe’s highest death toll from COVID-19 and is among the world’s highest in terms of deaths per head.

Some of the damage also reflects how Britain’s economy relied more on face-to-face consumer services than other countries, as well as disruption to schooling and routine healthcare which few other countries factored in to GDP.

However, Britain has vaccinated many more people than other European countries so far, raising the prospect of a bounce-back for its economy later this year.

News.Az 

You Might Also Like